CatSynth Pic: Luna and Keyboards

Beautiful black cat Luna strikes a “noir” pose atop one keyboard and next to another.  Submitted by Matthew Vasquez via our Facebook page.  I really like the way the stripes of light play against the keyboards, which in turn heighten the black cat’s figure.

This is Luna is not our Luna, but looks so much like her!  You can read our more recent tribute to the late great Luna of CatSynth here.

Identification of the synths/keyboards left as an exercise to the reader.

Wordless Wednesday: Orizaba

South on Orizaba Ave

Looking south on Orizaba Avenue in southwestern San Francisco from Lakeview and Ashton Mini Park.  You can read more about our visit to this spot in this article.

Lakeview and Ashton Mini Park, San Francisco

Many years ago, I noticed a small rock that appeared to be in the middle of the street at the top of a hill in the Ingleside neighborhood of San Francisco.  I also noticed it a few times while traveling on BART.  Turns out it is, in fact, an official San Francisco Park, the Lakeview and Ashton Mini Park.


[Click to enlarge]

It really is just a speck of undeveloped land on the crest of a hill in the middle of Ingleside, a largely residential neighborhood wedged between I-280 and CA 1 (19th Avenue).

From the official San Francisco Parks guide:

This rocky outcrop is part of a ridge of sandstone in the Merced and Ingleside Heights neighborhoods. While the park is very small, its grassy and rocky slopes are home to a variety of native plant species, including buckwheat, dudleya, farewell-to-spring, coast onion, and soap plant. This diversity of plants means there are flowers in bloom at Lakeview/Ashton Mini Park through most of the spring and summer. This wide window of flower availability provides a crucial long-term food source for many local butterflies and other insects. In 2003, a locally rare arboreal salamander was found hiding amongst the rocks. This relatively large brown salamander, four inches long when mature, has a whitish belly that in juveniles is darker and covered with light-blue spots. Arboreal salamanders have tails that are well adapted for grasping branches to help climb trees.

A couple of weeks ago, I decided to go check finally it out up close.  I made my way up the steep incline of Orizaba Avenue to the park, which also marks the ends of Shields and Lakeview Streets.

Orizaba Ave and Shields Street

As I had recalled from when I first noticed it, the park is dominated by a large mound of rock surrounded by tall scrub grass.  But there is a path through the grass to the top of the rock.

Path in Lakeview and Ashton Mini Park

And from the top of this rock is a fantastic and perhaps underappreciated view of the southwestern section of San Francisco.  Looking north along Orizaba, we see a wide swath of western San Francisco, including Forest Hill, Golden Gate Heights, and Mount Davidson (the highest natural point in the city).  We also see the iconic Sutro Tower peeking out from behind.

Looking northward

Looking south, we see the Ingleside and Sunnyside neighborhoods, bisected by I-280 and BART.  Beyond are the hills of Daly City and San Bruno mountain.

Looking South

The Pacific Ocean is visible in the distance to the west.  Closer by within Ingleside is another, larger park, with a copse of trees on top.

I did not visit the other park on this day.

This was a lovely spot, and I lingered there for quite a while despite the chill in the air.  It was, however, not entirely immune from the current problems of San Francisco, with a few signs of recent homeless and drug-use activity.  But overall, it was clean and quiet.  I will come back when I find myself in the vicinity again.

The western neighborhoods of the city still have a lot of secrets to offer, and I am eager to discover them.

 

Wordless Wednesday: Lake Merced Abstraction

Lake Merced

Lake Merced in the southwest corner of San Francisco.  Hipstamatic photo with a multi-exposure lens.

Wordless Wednesday: Washington Mews, New York

View north from Washington Mews, a small alley near Washington Square Park in Manhattan.  I liked the juxtaposition of building shapes and styles.

Every so often I worry I’m posting the same picture twice.  This was one of those times 😸

Wordless Wednesday: Windmill (Golden Gate Park)

Murphy Windmill, Golden Gate Park

The Murphy Windmill in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

You can find out more about the windmill and its history at outsidelands.org

CatSynth Pic: Zook and Moog Sub 37 (and Yamaha CP4)

Today we have Zook posing next to a Moog Sub 37 synthesizer and atop a Yamaha CP4 stage piano.  Submitted by Scott Blasko via our Facebook page.

This is a beautiful photo, and the lighting and texture are incredible!  We can see Zook’s black fur, expression, and silhouette even against the dark background and the dark surface of the keyboard.  Well done!

Wordless Wednesday: Glory Hole

Glory Hole, Lake Berryessa

The “Glory Hole” spillway at the Monticello Dam at Lake Berryessa, California.

Wordless Wednesday: California Modernism (Pacific Heights)

To me, this modernist home in the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco represents the height of “California Cool” of the 1950s and 1960s (even if it was probably built more recently).  It stood out from the more conservative brick-and-stone mansions to either side.

Wordless Wednesday: Shape Study (Lafayette Park, San Francisco)

Shape Study, Lafayette Park

A study in geometry and texture at Lafayette Park in San Francisco.