CatSynth pic: Nala and OB-6

Nala and OB-6

Nala the cat playing a OB-6 from Dave Smith Instruments and Tom Oberheim. Photo from nathan.yeager on Instagram.

Analog Cat. Nala plays the OB-6. #catsonsynthesizersinspace #catsofinstagram #cat #davesmithinstruments #oberheim #homerecording #ob6 #analogsynth #keyboard #keyboardcat #synthesizer #catsynth #cute #cutecats

CatSynth pic: Feline Modular (Ceramic knobs for modular synths)

Eevolute modular synth setup with cat figurine

Another from our friends at Eevo Lute Music & Technology. This one features a cat figurine atop a modular synth setup 😺

UPDATE: It’s more than a simple figurine. It is a knob cover that fits many modulars. You can find out more at https://www.amarowebshop.nl/a-48425107/extravaganza/katten-knoppen-voor-modulaire-synthesizers/. We will definitely be checking this out!

Hardly Strictly Personal 2017 Day 1: Vacuum Tree Head and More

We conclude our reverse-order look at the Hardly Strictly Personal 2017 Festival that took place at the Finnish Kaleva Hall in Berkeley about two months ago. This day featured Vacuum Tree Head among several other acts.

Vacuum Tree Head
[Photo by Karen de la Cuesta]

This was among the best Vacuum Tree Head shows I have experienced since joining the band, in terms of energy and musical tightness. The rhythm section, anchored by Justin Markovits on drums and John Shiurba on bass functioned well as a unit and provided a foundation for the rest of the band. We had three horn players: Joshua Marshal, Jason Bellenkes and Richard Lesnik. Our guitar section featured Richard Corny, and Michael de la Cuesta, who also was part of the synth/keyboard section of the band with me. And Jason Berry ran the show with new tunes, new arrangements and interstitial entertainment. We will have a full video of our set soon along with a more detailed review, but for now here is a little clip courtesy of our friend Rick Rees.

As mentioned in previous articles the overarching theme of HSP2017 was “A Celebration of Post-Beefheart Art.” The first two acts of the evening took the theme quite seriously. Earspray projected videos along with Beefhart clips mixed with live improvisations.

Earspray

The group features Ann O’Rourke on electronics and video, Carlos Jennings on electronics, and Mark Pino on percussion. Mark returned in Crow Crash Radio, which also featured Brian Strang on guitar Andrew Joron on theremin along with guest Garrett Caples on vocals.

Crow Crash Radio

Like Earspray, Crow Crash Radio worked the Beefhart theme directly into the contact of their set, with Caples channeling him in his vocal sound and style as the band covered Diddy Wah Diddy and other songs. If there was one thing that didn’t work, it was not being able to hear the vocals well, though perhaps that was part of the concept.

The band performances contrasted sharply with a quiet so set by Jakob Pek on guitar. He uses extended techniques on the instrument, preparations, and electronics to create unusual soundscapes. The sound is mostly long tones and timbres, but punctuated by percussive elements as well.

Jakob Pek

The final set of the evening brought Lost Planet to the stage.

Lost Planet

This band, which features Dave Slusser on winds and electronics, Thomas Scandura on drums, and Len Paterson and Steve Clarke on guitars, mixed loud rock elements with space jazz for an energetic set. In some ways, they combined elements prominent in the previous band sets of the evening.

It was fun to play with VTH on this night and hear the other groups, as I also did with CDP on night 3. We would like to thank Mika Pontecorvo for organizing this event, as well as Elijah Ponteocorvo, Kersti Abrams, Mark Pino and everyone else who followed teared to make it a success.

CatSynth pic: Clef Electronic Music B30 Microsynth

From this auction, via matrixsynth.

I had not heard of this instrument from Clef Electronic Music until this post. It does look a lot like my Octave CAT, and synth architecture and topology sounds a lot like it as well. From the post on matrixsynth:

“The B30 is a two VCO subtractive analogue synth that was available in kit form during the late seventies and early eighties. The synth was featured in Practical Electronics magazine and provided people with a more affordable way to buy a synthesizer than the extremely expensive ready built moogs etc. There is information available now online about the history of the synth and also the schematics and build instructions. I will also supply with the synth a 17 page printout of the instructions. These are also available here.

These synths are extremely rare and I have only ever seen two for sale on ebay in the last decade, this particular one is the only one I have seen with real wooden end cheeks and also the super cool pointer dials! I got the synth about 15 years ago and always intended to restore it to it’s full glory but have never had the time to do this. A change in my circumstances have prompted a reluctant sale.

CatSynth video: Cat, Alesis and iPod

From William Potter, victimasdelspleen on Instagram.