Wordless Wednesday CatSynth Pic: Mother-32

Wordless Wednesday: Sutro Baths Ruins at Lands End

The ruins of the Sutro Baths at Lands End on the western edge of San Francisco.

Quite a few of our recent Wordless Wednesdays have focused on the western parts of the city.  Here are some previous posts:

Wordless Wednesday: Orizaba

Wordless Wednesday: Lake Merced Abstraction

Wordless Wednesday: Windmill (Golden Gate Park)

In addition, there is our video and article about Lake Merced.

Wordless Wednesday: Independence Day

The flag we see every day out the window from CatSynth HQ.  We wish all our fellow Americans a happy 4th of July (Independence Day)!

(Shot on an iPhone using Hipstamatic Lisbon Pack)

Wordless Wednesday: Orizaba

South on Orizaba Ave

Looking south on Orizaba Avenue in southwestern San Francisco from Lakeview and Ashton Mini Park.  You can read more about our visit to this spot in this article.

Wordless Wednesday: Lake Merced Abstraction

Lake Merced

Lake Merced in the southwest corner of San Francisco.  Hipstamatic photo with a multi-exposure lens.

Wordless Wednesday: Washington Mews, New York

View north from Washington Mews, a small alley near Washington Square Park in Manhattan.  I liked the juxtaposition of building shapes and styles.

Every so often I worry I’m posting the same picture twice.  This was one of those times 😸

Wordless Wednesday: Windmill (Golden Gate Park)

Murphy Windmill, Golden Gate Park

The Murphy Windmill in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

You can find out more about the windmill and its history at outsidelands.org

Wordless Wednesday: California Street, San Francisco

California Street

Plaza of 550 California Street, at Kearny Street, San Francisco.

Wordless Wednesday: Glory Hole

Glory Hole, Lake Berryessa

The “Glory Hole” spillway at the Monticello Dam at Lake Berryessa, California.

Wordless Wednesday: California Modernism (Pacific Heights)

To me, this modernist home in the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco represents the height of “California Cool” of the 1950s and 1960s (even if it was probably built more recently).  It stood out from the more conservative brick-and-stone mansions to either side.