CatSynth pic: Cat and Teenage Engineering OP-1

Teenage Engineering OP-1

From Cats on Synthesizers in Space.

OK Cat People…… I just love this one ….. A serious looking, orange and white, tabby cat with a Teenage Engineering OP-1 Synthesizer experiencing zero gravity in a Space Ship. The OP-1 looks like a toy, but it is actually very powerful, feature packed little Synthesizer.

We have long been intrigued by the OP-1. Here is our visit to their NAMM 2014 booth.

CatSynth pic: Teenage Engineering Pocket Operator

Teenage Engineering pocket operator

Submitted by John F. Elberstein via Twitter.

“OK, it’s just a pocket synth, but there’s a cat with it ^^

Amidst the overwhelming abundance of synths at NAMM, we managed to miss this. If you have experience or opinions on the Teenage Engineering Pocket Operator series, please share.

NAMM 2014: Teenage Engineering OP-1 and OpLab

Our friends at Teenage Engineering were back at NAMM, with the latest iterations of the OP-1 and OpLab.

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The little screen on the OP-1 continues to delight, with one of the most unique interfaces from a non touch screen.  They added a new module that allows one to use the device as an Etch-A-Sketch and draw out pitch contours.  It even includes the shake-to-erase gesture.  The little cranks that go on top of the knobs are also new.

The OpLab, including some branded sensors, seems to finally be ready for prime time.

 

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The OpLab does allow one to use alternative sensors, and outputs control voltage suitable for analog modular synths in addition to controlling the OP-1.

Teenage Engineering OP-1 and Oplab

Teenage Engineering is always fun. That goes for both playing the instruments and visiting their both at NAMM. We remember the OP-1 from the previous show:

Teenage Engineering introduced Oplab this time around. It’s a DIY system with a small versatile connectivity hub and variety of available sensors, including this shoe:

The heart of the system is the Oplab device itself, with CV inputs and outputs (in a format that connects easily to Eurorack format modules, the OP-1 and other devices), MIDI and USB. The USB can used to connect to an iPad to control synth apps or receive control data. Similarly, the analog CV and custom digital connections serve both directions. In addition to the shoe, they have several available sensors, including pressure, tap and rotation, though they strongly encourage users to bring their own.

The little eviscerated hard-drive on the right is an example of the DIY spirit of the system. It turns out one can spin the disk inside a hard drive and generate useful pulses for temporal control. I had never thought of using a hard drive as a controller before.

The Oplab and its related devices should be available later this spring. I’m definitely intrigued.