NAMM 2019: Qu-Bit Electronix

One of our first stops at NAMM 2019 was to visit our friends at Qu-Bit Electronix. This year they had three new modules to share.

The first of the three was the Prism (center in the picture above). It combines three audio processors that are mapped to a three-dimension “prism” control space. One axis controls a comb filter, another a bit crusher, and the third is time/speed control. The audio processors operate on a buffer, which can either be continuously updated from audio input or “frozen” in time and looped. Finally, there is a multi-state filter that can either operate at the beginning or end of the signal chain. Of the three, this one perhaps intrigued me the most with the possibilities of mapping these different functions to CV input (e.g., from a Maths or a sequencer) in ways that push traditional music. You can hear a bit of it, along with the other two modules, in our video which features all three modules.

The second module was the Chord, or rather the new incarnation of the chord. It’s a four-voice polyphonic oscillator with both traditional waveforms (continuously morphable) and a new set of wavetables. The oscillators can be stacked into chords, or in this new version each controlled separately for polyphony in the music-theory sense of the word – yes, with the right sequencer, this module can do four-voice counterpoint. The chord mode includes a variety of standard western four-voice chords (i.e., with a seventh degree), but also the ability to add custom chords that include microtones or dense tone clusters. It’s also more compact than the original, slimmed down to just 14hp.

The final module was the Bloom, a sequencer that could generate variations on the fly using a proprietary fractal algorithm. The amount of variation, from none to completely random, can be controlled dynamically via CV, as can the number of steps in the sequence, for quite a range of variety. And with two channels, it would seem to pair nicely the Chord.

As always, it’s fun to visit with Qu-Bit and see what they up to, especially as they are CatSynth superfans. And we look forward to seeing these modules out in the wild over the course of the year. The Prism is due in March, the Chord in late spring, and the Bloom in the fall.

CatSynth Video: Korg M1 Modded circuit bent with Marcel

From polynominaldotcom on YouTube, via matrixsynth.

Just modded and bent the classic M1/M1r wavetable with 6 switches on the back of the machine. 5 sounds demo with circuit bent options.
First 3 demo with normal Midi keyboard, In 2 others, the Mi1r is driven by an algorithmic generator module ‘Turing machine’. Generated patterns are midi converted with a Doepfer a-162 cv to MIDI module.

Very interesting to see a Korg M1 and M1R “bent” this way. And if that feline portrait looks familiar, it’s probably because you’ve seen it before. Eric of Polynominal.com and his cat Marcel are good friends of ours at CatSynth, and we have featured many of Marcel’s pictures.

CatSynth Pic: Giuliano and MPC Live

Handsome Giuliano poses with an Akai MPC Live. From automageddon on Instagram.

Giuliano and MPC Live: Maine Coon Production Centre


CatSynth Pic: Häbbmaster modules

Cat showing off this collection of unique custom synth modules from Häbbmaster. Via haebmaster on Instagram.

You can hear a bit of of his percussion modules in this video.

View this post on Instagram

A little bouncing ball demo. #sdiy #sergesynthesizer #sergemodular Sound is from the smooth generator, pitch modulated by a sequencer . Upper half of the DUSG is a sawtooth modulating the speed of the lower half and triggers the sequencer. Lower half triggers the envelope which controls a low pass gate.

A post shared by Rainer Burkhardt (@haebbmaster) on

CatSynth Pic: Gracie repairs a Roland MC-202

After spending so much time around vintage synths, Gracie is ready to take on the fine art of repairing. From Alsún Ní Chasaide (Alison Cassidy) on Facebook.

Gracie feels ready to take on this broken Roland MC-202. Good luck!!

CatSynth Pics: MiniMoog Voyager

From @ModularSynths (Daniel.ModularSynths) on Twitter, we have this photo of a cat inspecting a MiniMoog Voyager. Specifically, it appears to be the Voyager XL model.

Immer neugierig (Always curious)

IWe are sure this cat is making some interesting music with his curiosity, although the Voyagers are monophonic. So we will only hear one paw at a time.

Please tweet us your cat-and-music @catsynth to be featured in a future post and across our social media platforms.

CatSynth Video: Dino’s Ode to Noise (Ok Housecat)

A panoply of musical noisemakers from okhousecat. Watch the video for the feline entrance 😸

CatSynth Pic: Roland Jupiter-4

Cat with a vintage Roland Jupiter-4 synthesizer. By Matt Vraja via Facebook.

Jupiter-fur

The Jupiter-4 was a transitional synth in Roland’s early offerings, from the more modular mono-synths to its dominant analog and digital models from the 1980s.

The first Jupiter synth. It was among one of the first poly synthesizers (4 individual voices which could be synced together for one fat monophonic lead), it had a pitch wheel that could be assigned to the VCA, VCF, VCO or all together, there are 8 memory locations and a cool arpeggiator – the arpeggiator can be heard in the Duran Duran classic, “Rio”. It also has a very slow LFO for those ever-so-long filter sweeps. Pretty good for 1978!

http://www.vintagesynth.com/roland/jup4.php

CatSynth Pic: Marcel, Korg M1R, and Minimoog

Marcel is back today, with a pair of Korg M1R modules. We also see a Minimoog in the back.

From Eric of polynominal.com.

CatSynth Video: Polyend Seq & Poly and Eurorack modular

From Polyend on YouTube, via matrixsynth.

“Another piece of sonic adventure from Alna and his helper. Polyend Seq & Poly couple ruling the Eurorack modular and DSI Prophet. Enjoy!”

Here is another video of the Polyend sequencer, sans cat

“Equipped with a wide array of Ins and Outs, allowing you to communicate freely with other devices of every era and genre. You can also feed tracks with MIDI notes using your favorite MIDI controller. Every track can be recorded step by step or in real time and then quantized independently”